søndag den 14. december 2014

A bridge too far, or too little, or something... (A non cryptozoological interlude)

This has absolutely nothing to do with cryptozoology, but the story is too good not to be told. In the spring of this year, Danish authorities started to do a bit of refurbishing and general maintenance along the Gudenaa River - the biggest river in Denmark - north of the town of Horsens in western Denmark. The main purpose was to make it easier for the local population of trout and salmon to pass through this particular section of the river. One of the things that had to be done, was to remove an earthen dam that had almost completely blocked the river valley for more than 80 years. Nothing to strange about that, but then they diggers started...

The dam was not just a dam - inside it the workmen found a bridge, and not just any bridge. They found a 50 meter long and 14 meter high bridge, that "disappeared" 85 years ago. Until this year, it had officially been demolished, but no further details were known. Well, you know hos easy it is to misplace things...

A picture of the bridge, which has now been restored and is to be used by bikers and walkers in the future, can be seen here:


The official (re) opening of the bridge is next week, and it will from now on be known as "The Red Bridge".

Nice little Christmas surprise!!

No wolves, no trolls, only dogs!!!

As my last blogpost states, a dead headless young deer was found on Friday in a very popular deerpark/forest just north of Copenhagen. It created quite a stir, as it wasn't just killed. It's entire head and neck had been ripped off. Since wolves were officially added to the danish fauna in 2012, everybody has been a little jittery, so of course the newspapers went beserk with stories about whether it could actually be a wolf. And the conspiracy theorists started coming out of the woodwork suggesting that a wolf had been deliberately released (it is after all a deerpark which is completely fenced in) or that somebody had brought the dead deer from somewhere else to get things going a little. And by the way, it was not as I stated in my earlier post a young roe deer, but a young fallow deer. Anyhow - DNA-samples were collected, and the results are now in. The attacker was a dog, not a wolf. This of course has in no way deminished the attack from the anti-wolf lobby, who for some reason thinks a small handful of wolves are far more dangerous than any number of dogs. I am certain we haven't heard the last of this. 

And now for no particular reason - here is a crown photographed very close to where the deer was found :-)

torsdag den 11. december 2014

Yikes!! There are predators on the loose just outside of Copenhagen!!!

Danish media are in a state of mild panic today following the find of a very dead roe deer in Dyrehaven, a very popular danish deerpark/woodland - in fact the most visited forest in Denmark. It is located just north of Copenhagen, and is used by hundreds, if not thousands of people on a daily basis - especially in summer. It is also home to a large deer-population that are strictly controlled by the authorities. You can find red deer, fallow deer, sika deer and roe deer in quantities. Although today it is in quantities -1, as a big roe deer calf was found killed.


As the picture on the link shows, someone or something had basically ripped the deer's head off. The authorities are at the moment working from the assumption that the culprit is a large dog, although the actual kill does not confirm with a standard dog kill, nor for that matter with a wolf kill. DNA-samples has been taken, but the results will probably not be in until after the weekend. Until further notice people are being adviced to be careful should they meet a big stray dog in the area. The Danish anti-wolf lobby is of course already up in arms, wanting every Danish wolf shot, just in case it is one of them - nevermind the fact that the closest sighting of a wolf is some 300 km west of Copenhagen.